Food Myths

Foods Myths

Food myths still abound today and some are just plain crazy.

One of the most mentioned is that eating eggs are bad for your cholesterol level. Per Readers Digest, “Eggs have gotten an unfounded bad rap; the latest research shows that they don’t actually contribute to high cholesterol. In fact, eggs are an inexpensive source of many nutrients, including zinc and iron, antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin D, and the brain-boosting chemical choline. Keep cholesterol in check by monitoring saturated fat in your diet.” So go eat the whole egg and stop the worrying about the yellow yoke.

Here is another, most people believe that margarine is better for you than butter. Not exactly true. “Butter and margarine have about the same amount of calories. But while margarine, made from vegetable oils, was created as a more healthful alternative to butter (which contains cholesterol and saturated fat), some margarines are actually unhealthier because they contain trans fats, which have even more adverse effects on cholesterol and heart health. (This is the real difference between butter and margarine.) If you choose margarine, look for trans fat-free brands.” So use butter, but I would recommend that you eat it in moderation or if you want to use margarine make sure that it is trans fat-free.

Or that fat free and low fat foods are better for you, “When it comes to meat and some dairy products, it’s generally true that the less fat, the better. But not so with packaged, processed foods. Call it the “Snackwells” lesson: When manufacturers remove a certain ingredient (fat) from a certain food (cookies), they need to compensate for the taste by adding other not-so-healthy ingredients (sugar). Companies are constantly tinkering with the ratios of sugar, fat, salt and other ingredients in such foods. Now, most nutrition experts believe you’re better off avoiding artificially fat-free foods and opting instead for whole foods with healthy fats, like nuts.

And how about those frozen fruits and vegetables not being good as fresh ones, “Fresh fruits and vegetables are more nutritious than the frozen and canned variety—the instant they are picked. However, the foods you find in the produce section have often had a long journey, often spending days or even weeks in transit from the farm or orchard. During shipping and storage, natural enzymes are released in fresh fruit and vegetables that cause them to lose nutrients. By contrast, food processors quick-freeze fresh-picked produce, which preserves much of its vitamin and mineral content.” If you want to eat good for you fresh fruits and vegetables buy them in season from your local farmer.

But what about the fats you eat making you fat? From BestLife, “Even though avocados, walnuts, olive oil, and other healthy fats are full of body-boosting benefits, there’s still this weird fear that eating fat is going to make you fat, even though it’s a total myth.

 So many women still fear eating fat, stemming from the low-fat craze that captivated the public in the ‘80s and ‘90s. But we got it wrong,” says Michelle Cady, integrative nutrition health coach “When you increase your healthy fat intake and lower your intake of refined, white carbohydrates, you’ll stay satiated longer, stabilize your blood sugar, and teach your body to burn off extra body fat, rather than rely on quick bursts of carbs, sugar, and glucose for energy.”” So go out and eat a more balanced diet and stop worrying about fats so much.

And finally stop the fuss about sugar, just use it in moderation and not to excess. Fruits and vegetables have sugar in them naturally and you don’t hear people in the know saying not to eat them do you? Well the truth is that consuming foods or drinks that have sugar in them in moderation is not so bad as many make it out to be. Just do not be drinking a sugary drink every day and do it just once in a while. And think about having a nice glass of water instead and don’t get me started about that!

That is my opinion- Jumpin Jersey Mike

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